Farrakhan rants against 'satanic' Jews following Facebook ban

“I’m here to separate the good Jews from the Satanic Jews,” the 86-year-old said to a large audience gathered at the controversial St. Sabina Church in Chicago’s South Side.

By JERUSALEM POST STAFF
May 10, 2019 12:00
1 minute read.
Louis Farrakhan

Louis Farrakhan. (photo credit: REUTERS/REBECCA COOK)

Nation of Islam leader and notorious antisemite Louis Farrakhan raged against "satanic" Jews following his ban from Facebook, in a speech made at a Catholic church in Chicago on Thursday, according to the Chicago Sun-Times.

The social media platform banned the minister last week for violating its terms regarding spreading hate speech.

“I’m here to separate the good Jews from the Satanic Jews,” the 86-year-old said to a large audience gathered at the controversial St. Sabina Church in Chicago’s South Side. “I have not said one word of hate. I do not hate Jewish people. Not one that is with me has ever committed a crime against the Jewish people, black people, white people. As long as you don’t attack us, we won’t bother you."

“I am dangerous,” Farrakhan said. “I’m not dangerous on my own. God named me dangerous to Satan and his vermin.”

Farrakhan has been labeled an extremist by the Anti-Defamation League and numerous other groups for a slew of antisemitic comments made over the years, including calling Jews "termites," saying that the "powerful Jews are my enemy," and that the Jews are "responsible for all of this filth and degenerate behavior that Hollywood is putting out."

The Chicago church's Rev. Michael Pfleger’s received much protest for inviting the controversial minister, including from the president of the Illinois Holocaust Museum - a Holocaust survivor herself, but shrugged it off during the event.

"This past week, I have been cursed at, received an overwhelming amount of hate calls, emails, hateful Facebook postings,” Pfleger said. “It is interesting to me that those who accuse him of hate have been so hateful this past week. Oh, the hypocrisy.”

The reverend also encouraged his parishioners to film the event and publish the videos on Facebook to defy the ban.

In response to his support, Farrakhan said of Pfleger: “I love my brother. In fact, we kissed when I came up here. This is not queer. This is straight up love.”

“I’m not a misogynist, I’m not a homophobe,” Farrakhan said. “Don’t be angry with me if I stand up on God’s word.”


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