Vindman’s synagogue accepts letters of support following ouster

Vindman was the Jewish staffer who was among the first to raise flags about President Donald Trump’s pressure on Ukraine to investigate a political rival.

FILE PHOTO: National Security Council aide Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, takes a break as he testifies beforebefore the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill as part of the impeachment inquiry into U.S. President Donald Trump, in Washington, U.S., November 19, 2019 (photo credit: JACQUELYN MARTIN / POOL / REUTERS)
FILE PHOTO: National Security Council aide Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, takes a break as he testifies beforebefore the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill as part of the impeachment inquiry into U.S. President Donald Trump, in Washington, U.S., November 19, 2019
(photo credit: JACQUELYN MARTIN / POOL / REUTERS)
(JTA) — Alexander Vindman’s synagogue in Springfield, Virginia, is accepting letters of support in his behalf.
Vindman, the Jewish staffer who was among the first to raise flags about President Donald Trump’s pressure on Ukraine to investigate a political rival, was removed from his position as an expert on US policy in Ukraine at the National Security Council on Friday.
“The Vindman family is a valued member of Congregation Adat Reyim’s community of friends. We are proud to support Lt Colonel Alex Vindman during this challenging time,” Rebecca Geller, co-president of Congregation Adat Reyim, told JTA.
In addition, for those seeking ways to show support, the Vindman family has requested donations be made to the synagogue via www.adatreyim.org in Alexander Vindman’s honor.
Trump also recalled Gordon Sondland, US ambassador to the European Union. Both Vindman and Sondland testified against Trump in the US House of Representatives, providing damaging testimony that led to Trump’s impeachment. Their removal comes just days after Trump was acquitted by the Republican-led US Senate in an impeachment trial.
Also Friday, Vindman’s twin brother, Lt. Col. Yevgeny Vindman, was asked to leave his job as a White House lawyer. Both Vindmans, Jews who immigrated with their father from Ukraine in 1979, were reassigned to the Army.
Vindman said during his testimony that his father feared that his speaking out would bring retaliation.