Queen of the national religious

An encounter with Deputy Mayor Hagit Moshe

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August 9, 2018 12:38
2 minute read.
Deputy Mayor Hagit Moshe

Deputy Mayor Hagit Moshe. (photo credit: MARC ISRAEL SELLEM)

 
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Hagit Moshe, deputy mayor and head of the municipal Finance Committee, is the president of the Jerusalem branch of the Bayit Yehudi and the leader of the party at city council. While not a candidate for mayor, she is deeply involved in gathering all the national religious residents in the city behind her, aiming to present as large a list as possible that will include the different parts of this sector.

According to several findings, they represent about 18% of the Jewish population (compared to the 39% of the haredim) but they are spread among various – sometimes almost opposing – sides, between modern Orthodox (many of them located on the left side of the political map) “light religious” (including former religious – called datlashim) and right-wingers identified with the settlement movement. Moshe wants them all in her nest, arguing people in this religious segment have something different to say and to promote in this city.

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