Norwegian Muslims to form 'ring of peace' around Oslo synagogue in solidarity with Jews

“Muslims want to show that we deeply despise all types hatred of Jews, and that we are there to support them,” the group said in a statement to Hope Not Hate.

By JPOST.COM STAFF
February 18, 2015 08:41
2 minute read.
Demonstration

‘Muslims against terror’ demonstrate in Hamburg, January 12.. (photo credit: FABIAN BIMMER / REUTERS)

 
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Norwegian Muslims plan to form a “ring of peace” around a synagogue in Oslo this Saturday as a gesture of solidarity with the Jewish community in the Scandinavian country.

“If the jihadists want to use violence in the name of Islam, they must go through us Muslims first,” one of the event’s planners told Hope Not Hate, a grassroots anti-extremism organization based in Britain.

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“Muslims want to show that we deeply despise all types hatred of Jews, and that we are there to support them,” the group said in a statement to Hope Not Hate.

The Jewish communities of Europe have been growing increasingly apprehensive over a spate of recent attacks by Islamist-inspired gunmen.

Police shot dead a gunman on Sunday whose attacks on a Copenhagen synagogue and an event promoting free speech may have been inspired by an attack on French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo last month, authorities said.

Denmark's spy chief Jens Madsen said the gunman was known to the intelligence services prior to the shooting and probably acted alone. He did not elaborate.

Two civilians were killed and five police were wounded in the two separate attacks in the Danish capital on Saturday.

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"We cannot yet say anything concrete about the motive ... but are considering that he might have been inspired by the events in Paris some weeks ago," Madsen told a news conference.

Danish authorities have been on alert since Islamist gunmen killed 17 people in three days of violence in Paris in January that began with an attack on Charlie Hebdo, long known for its acerbic cartoons on Islam, other religions and politicians.

Police who had earlier released a photo of the suspect dressed in a heavy winter coat and maroon mask, said they did not believe he had received training in iihadist camps in the Middle East.

Witnesses to the Copenhagen attacks said the gunman fired up to 40 shots at a cafe hosting a free speech event with Swedish artist Lars Vilks, who has received death threats for depicting the head of the Prophet Mohammad on a dog.

Vilks was unhurt but a 55-year-old man was killed. A guard was later shot in the head outside Copenhagen's biggest synagogue, where around 80 people were celebrating a bat mitzva. Two police officers were also wounded there.

Police shot dead the suspect early on Sunday after he opened fire on them near a railway station in the Noerrebro district, not far from the sites of the two attacks. Officers later searched his home, which was nearby.

Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt said the attacks were terrorism and promised to protect freedom of speech and Denmark's small but vibrant Jewish community.

"When you mercilessly fire deadly bullets at innocent people taking part in a debate, when you attack the Jewish community, you attack our democracy," Thorning-Schmidt said outside the synagogue. "We will do everything possible to protect our Jewish community."

Denmark's former chief rabbi, Rabbi Bent Lexner, told Israeli Army Radio the synagogue guard was "a fantastic guy", adding: "We are in shock. I am sitting now with the parents of the man killed. We didn't think such a thing could happen in Denmark."

Reuters contributed to this report.

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