Obama: Algeria attack a reminder of al-Qaida threat

US president offers to provide assistance to Algerian government after deadly hostage siege of desert gas plant.

By REUTERS
January 20, 2013 03:36
1 minute read.
Algerian army guards road to gas plant

Algerian army guards road to gas plant 370. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
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WASHINGTON - The deadly hostage siege in Algeria is a reminder of the threat posed by al-Qaida, US President Barack Obama said Saturday.

Obama offered to provide any assistance the Algerian government needs after the siege at a desert gas plant and said the United States was seeking a "fuller understanding" from Algerian authorities of what took place there.

"The thoughts and prayers of the American people are with the families of all those who were killed and injured in the terrorist attack in Algeria," Obama said in his first comments on the hostage crisis.

Obama's written statement was issued by the White House after the Algerian army carried out a dramatic final assault to end a siege by Islamist militants in which 23 hostages were killed, many of them believed to be foreigners.

The statement made no mention of Americans who were caught up in the hostage crisis. One American has been confirmed dead, and a source close to the crisis said two Americans were among those freed as the Algerian army closed in.

Some Western governments had expressed frustration at not being informed of the Algerian authorities' plans to storm the remote complex, but US officials had remained cautious in their comments as the situation unfolded.


"The blame for this tragedy rests with the terrorists who carried it out," Obama said. "We have been in constant contact with Algerian officials and stand ready to provide whatever assistance they need in the aftermath of this attack."

"We also will continue to work closely with all of our partners to combat the scourge of terrorism in the region," he added.

"This attack is another reminder of the threat posed by al-Qaida and other violent extremist groups in North Africa," Obama said. "In the coming days, we will remain in close touch with the government of Algeria to gain a fuller understanding of what took place so that we can work together to prevent tragedies like this in the future."

Obama, who takes the official oath of office on Sunday for a second term at the White House and will then be sworn in again publicly on Monday, juggled inauguration preparations and briefings from his national security aides on the hostage situation in Algeria.

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