IAEA's chief inspector to resign

Heinonen to leave after 30 years, monitored Iran's nuclear program.

By JPOST.COM STAFF
July 1, 2010 13:19
1 minute read.
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nuclear summit april 311. (photo credit: Associated Press)

 
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The International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) announced Thursday that Ollie Heinonen, the chief of its safeguards department which inspects nations' nuclear programs to ensure that fissile materials are not being diverted for military use, was planning on leaving his job for personal reasons after spending 30 years at the organization.

"We confirm that Mr Heinonen informed the director general of his intention to resign as of the end of August for personal reasons," IAEA spokeswoman Gill Tudor was quoted by Reuters as saying.

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Heinonen, a 63-year-old Finnish radiochemist, caused great international worry in February 2008 with a power-point presentation to  diplomats showing links between Teheran's efforts to process uranium and Iranian tests of high explosives and modifications to missiles to deliver a nuclear payload.

Two IAEA inspectors were told they would denied access to nuclear facilities in Iran, by Atomic Energy Organization of Iran head Ali Akbar Salehi on June 21, according to ISNA.

The Iranian news agency quoted Salehi as saying the inspectors had “disclosed information before it had been examined officially” and “provided the media with false information on Iran’s nuclear work” at a recent IAEA Board of Governors meeting in Vienna.

Two IAEA inspectors were told they would be denied access to nuclear facilities in Iran, by Atomic Energy Organization of Iran head Ali Akbar Salehi on June 21, according to ISNA.

The Iranian news agency quoted Salehi as saying the inspectors had “disclosed information before it had been examined officially” and “provided the media with false information on Iran’s nuclear work” at a recent IAEA Board of Governors meeting in Vienna.


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