MK Cabel questioned by police in Netanyahu newspaper affair

In 2014, Cabel initiated the "Israel Hayom bill" that would have outlawed the distribution of free newspapers.

By
January 12, 2017 13:34
1 minute read.
Eitan Cabel

Eitan Cabel. (photo credit: MARC ISRAEL SELLEM/THE JERUSALEM POST)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For a symbolic $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Don't show it again

MK Eitan Cabel (Zionist Union) said on Thursday that he was summoned by the police to testify as part of the corruption investigation, termed Case 2000, into Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s alleged dealings with Yediot Aharonot publisher Arnon “Noni” Mozes.

"Two days ago I was summoned by the police," said Cabel in an interview to the Military Radio. "They wanted to know if I knew anything. I told them anything I knew, but it wasn't much."

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


"I really knew nothing about the about those two [Netanyahu and Mozes] speaking, a fact that I find now very embarrassing."

Cabel stressed that he wasn't being investigated as a suspect. "I was there for a short period of time. They asked specific questions and I and gave them all I got."

In 2014, Cabel initiated the "Israel Hayom bill" that would have outlawed the distribution of free newspapers, including the pro-Netanyahu Israel Hayom. Two weeks after the bill passed in preliminary reading, Netanyahu dissolved the Knesset and thus the bill was halted.

"I wasn't operated by anyone," said Cabel, when asked about the support the bill got by Yedioth Aharonot in its coverage. "It is natural that when interests combine you see such things. As the chairman, I see it in many cases that are being discussed in the Economics committee."

"But it embarrasses me to answer this question. People have known me for many years; this attempt to reduce my to the size of a pawn is outrageous."



"I initiated the bill on my own, from its very beginning, to its end."


Related Content

June 25, 2018
The Lounge: June 26, 2018

By MICHAL GALANTI