Palestinian musicians: 'Habibi you can drive my car' honors Saudi women

Musicians honor Saudi female drivers by creating an Arab cover of the famous Beatles song.

By
July 5, 2018 13:11
Palestinian musicians: 'Habibi you can drive my car' honors Saudi women

Syrian singer Nano Raies sings Arabic cover version for "Baby you can drive my car" . (photo credit: YOUTUBE SCREENSHOT)

 
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Palestinian cellist Naseem Alatrash and Syrian singer Nano Raies recorded a cover version of "Baby You Can Drive My Car" by the Beatles to honor the Saudi Arabian decision to allow female citizens of the kingdom to drive, beginning on June 24.




US radio station PRI's The World program and the Berklee College of Music, also in Boston, teamed up to provide Alatrash and Raies with the recording means to produce this homage to both Beatles and automobile freedom.

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The other musicians include Tony Barhoum and Tariq Rantisi who are Palestinian and Jordanian Layth Sidiq.

The cover uses Middle Eastern instruments, like the stringed oud and the darbuka drum, along with Western instruments.
 

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