History in the making? Saudi airliner lands in Israel - for maintenance

Typically, routine maintenance on such planes takes about a few weeks, officials said.

By
May 6, 2015 22:01
Saudi Arabian airlines

Saudi Arabian airlines. (photo credit: Courtesy)

 
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The arrival of jumbo jet with the logo "Saudia" to Ben-Gurion Airport overnight Tuesday generated a stir in the Israeli media on Wednesday after surprised airport workers spotted the plane.

The plane in question, an Airbus A330-300 devoid of passengers, arrived from Brussels to Tel Aviv for routine maintenance work with the Bedek Aviation Company, a subsidiary of Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI), officials said. A European client that works with Bedek for plane maintenance happens to lease its jets to various corporations, including Saudia, they explained.

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"IAI confirmed that the Airbus came to IAI facilities in order to have maintenance work done due to an agreement that IAI has with a European company that leases the plane to Saudi Arabia," a spokeswoman for IAI told The Jerusalem Post. 

Typically, routine maintenance on such planes takes about a few weeks, officials said.

Saudia – also called Saudi Arabian Airlines – is the national airline of the gulf state, based in Jeddah. Israel and Saudi Arabia do not have diplomatic relations.

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