Nazi leader’s sister hid Jews near Brussels

Hanna Nadel recalls how she and 2 other Jews were saved during Holocaust by the sister of a Belgian Nazi leader.

By JTA
November 5, 2012 11:54
1 minute read.
Nazi poster by Dieter Kalenbach

Nazi poster by Dieter Kalenbach 370. (photo credit: Reuters)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

The sister of a Belgian Nazi leader hid three Jews in her home near Brussels during the Holocaust, according to one of the survivors.

Hanna Nadel, now 86, said she, her mother and her niece were rescued by M. Cornet, the sister of Leon Degrelle, who as leader of the Belgian Nazi Rexen movement was responsible for deporting Jews to their deaths during the German occupation of Belgium.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


Nadel's account, related to the historian Jan Maes, appeared earlier this week in the Belgian-Jewish monthly Joods Actueel.

The three, having escaped deportation orders, wandered with their suitcases around the town of Sint-Genesius Rode, where they happened upon a help wanted sign on Cornet’s door. The mother rang the doorbell and Cornet, without asking many questions, hired the mother as cook and Nadel and her niece to work as chambermaids.

Cornet knew the three women were Jewish and promised them they would survive. Visitors associated with the Flemish Nazi movement would routinely dine at the house; the three Jewish women would hide in the basement. 

Nadel’s mother sometimes would cook gefilte fish, which the lady of the house advertised to her guests as “oriental fish," Nadel recalled.

Nadel immigrated to Israel after the war. Degrelle left for Spain, where he died of old age in 1994, escaping the death sentences that his Nazi associates received back home.

Related Content

Joan Rivers
August 28, 2014
Joan Rivers rushed to hospital following throat surgery

By JPOST.COM STAFF