New Pope pledges good relations with Jews

In message to Rome's chief rabbi, Pope Francis says he hopes to continue progress in relations between Catholics and Jews.

By REUTERS
March 14, 2013 23:14
1 minute read.
Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio who was elected Pope Francis I [file].

Pope Francis I 370. (photo credit: EUTERS/Enrique Marcarian)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

VATICAN CITY - Pope Francis reached out on Thursday to Rome's Jewish community, saying he hoped he would be able to contribute to furthering good relations between Catholics and Jews.

The new pope sent a message to Rome's chief rabbi, Riccardo Di Segni, inviting him to his inaugural Mass at the Vatican on March 19.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


"I sincerely hope to be able to contribute to the progress that relations between Jews and Catholics have enjoyed since the Second Vatican Council," he said, according to a statement on Vatican Radio.

Francis said he hoped to be able to contribute to "a spirit of renewed collaboration".

Relations between Catholics and Jews improved greatly after the 1962-1965 Second Vatican Council, which issued a landmark statement repudiating the concept of collective Jewish guilt for Jesus's death and urged dialogue with all religions.

Both of Francis's immediate predecessors, Benedict XVI and John Paul II, visited Rome's main synagogue.

The Rome Jewish community is the oldest in the diaspora and plays a guiding role in Catholic-Jewish relations worldwide.



World Jewish organizations welcomed the election of Francis, who maintained good relations with the Argentine Jewish community when he was archbishop of Buenos Aires.

"There is much in his record that reassures us about the future," said Abe Foxman, national director of the Anti-Defamation League in the United States.

In 2010, the future pope published a book on inter-faith dialogue together with Argentine Rabbi Abraham Skorka.

In Israel, the Chief Rabbinate of the Jewish state said Francis's past "good relations with the Jewish people are well known" and was confident his pontificate would develop them further.

Related Content

Joan Rivers
August 28, 2014
Joan Rivers rushed to hospital following throat surgery

By JPOST.COM STAFF