Books: Rash decisions

Lynda Cohen Loigman’s debut novel explores the deep secrets of a family in 1950s Brooklyn.

By BY RIVKAH LAMBERT ADLER
March 10, 2016 11:17
3 minute read.
Brooklyn

Brooklyn. (photo credit: Wikimedia Commons)

The personalities of Mort and Abe are about as different as brothers can be. Nonetheless, they both work at the family’s cardboard-box-manufacturing business and live, together with their wives and children, in a two-family house in Brooklyn.

Mort, husband to Rose, is an easy character to despise. In his great longing for a son, he all but ignores the daughters he has. As The Two-Family House – Lynda Cohen Loigman’s debut novel – unfolds, we learn that Mort gave up his education and career dreams to join his charismatic, but not wholly capable brother Abe, in the family business. It’s still hard to see Mort sympathetically. His office at the box company is a metaphor for his personality.

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