Libya's post-revolution predicament

Absent collective nationalism, the NTC must buy the loyalty of valuable renegade militias.

By DANIEL NISMAN
January 19, 2012 11:24
4 minute read.
Libyans protest against NTC in Benghazi

Libyans protest against NTC in Benghazi (R) 311. (photo credit: REUTERS/Esam Al-Fetori )

 
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Libya is currently undergoing a critical phase of its transition process, as the recognized government (NTC) attempts to assert its power over the country. The focal point of these efforts lies at the reformation of the Libyan national military. In post Gaddafi-Libya, this feat requires garnering the trust of powerful tribal militias, many of whom are reluctant to relinquish their hard-fought positions acquired during the civil war.


Efforts to establish a national military reached a crucial phase in January, when the NTC named Major General Yussef Al-Mangush as chief of staff.  The appointment has since been rejected by two powerful coalitions of tribal militias; the Thwars coalition, which includes the Misrata and Zintan factions; and the Cyrenaica Military Council (CMC), composed of militias in eastern Libya.

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