Rosh Hashanah: Filled with meaning

The traditions of Rosh Hashanah have maintained themselves throughout the years because many of us have infused into the rituals and davening a meaning that captures the new year for us.

By DAVID GEFFEN
September 6, 2018 22:38
APPLES AND honey: The classic Rosh Hashanah combination.

APPLES AND honey: The classic Rosh Hashanah combination.. (photo credit: SUFECO/FLICKR)

 
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Some 70 years ago, this appeared in a weekly Jewish newspaper in the USA: “Rosh Hashanah was a day of much praying, much talking, cantorial music, and shofar blowing... When we got home, we dipped some apple in honey, symbolic of a sweet year, and we wished one another that they be written down for a good year. Then there was the deluxe yom tov meal that mama had prepared for new year with her special tagelach as well. On the following day, we walked to a nearby lake and threw our sins away.”

The traditions of Rosh Hashanah have maintained themselves throughout the years because many of us have infused into the rituals and davening a meaning that captures the new year for us. Personally, I recall sitting in shul by my father, reading as many tefillot as I could. Sometimes, I was a bit tired so I snuck out to be with my friends who were on the sidewalk by the shul doing what they pleased. Then I went back in and waited for the tiny little shofar to be blown. No giant shofarot in those days. I have these memories – really poignant. I believe, however that Rosh Hashanah, these days, should provide us something more spiritual for the coming year.

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