Dating Games: Home for the holidays

Take the time to learn about each other’s traditions and imagine how you would combine them if you were to start a family together.

By TAMAR CASPI SHNALL
November 29, 2012 13:51
4 minute read.
Home for the holidays

Cartoon holidays 521. (photo credit: Pepe Fainberg)

 
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From the High Holy Days through New Year (including Hanukka and Shabbatot), there is ample opportunity to get together with your family. If you are dating someone new, that means there is ample opportunity to introduce your new beau to your family’s old traditions.

Celebrating the holidays is an amazing time to be together and to reminisce about where these traditions began… your great-great-aunt’s banana bread recipe with the secret ingredient that keeps it moist… that time the table’s centerpiece caught on fire and candles were outlawed from gatherings… going to the same family’s home year after year to break the fast where everyone knows the routine: who’s making the egg salad and who’s making the dessert and who ought to just buy the bagels and lox and stay out of the kitchen… singing Grace After Meals with the same hand gestures and inflections because everyone went to Jewish summer camp together.

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