Shedding a negative image

For years the poor relation of nearby Caesarea, Or Akiva now offers a more affordable alternative with the same employment, commercial opportunities.

By JOHN BENZAQUEN
August 29, 2013 12:39
Demand for real estate in Or Akiva is brisk.

Or Akiva city view 521. (photo credit: Courtesy Or Akiva Municipality)

 
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Or Akiva, a small town next to the upmarket city of Caesarea, started life in the early ’50s as a ma’abara (transit camp) for the multitude of immigrants who flooded the country at that time. The vast majority of residents came from Morocco, and when the Construction and Housing Ministry built permanent housing for the ma’abara residents, it did so in the area of the transit camp.

Those residents who were qualified to fulfill the new state’s manpower needs and could find jobs left the ma’abara and found accommodation elsewhere. Those who remained – the vast majority – were difficult to employ; they had been small shopkeepers, and under the changed circumstances they were only suited to low-paying manual jobs.

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