Mubarak faces 'health crisis' after guilty verdict

Former Egyptian president convicted of complicity in killings of protesters; police, protesters clash outside court.

By REUTERS, JPOST.COM STAFF
June 2, 2012 16:59
Mubarak is wheeled out of courtroom

Former Egyptian president Mubarak in court 370. (photo credit: REUTERS/Stringer)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

CAIRO - Egypt's deposed president Hosni Mubarak was admitted to a prison hospital following a "health crisis" on Saturday after he was sentenced to life in prison, the state's news agency MENA reported.

"Mubarak has entered to Tora prison hospital after coming out from the aircraft that was transferring him from court to prison," the agency said. Mubarak, who had been in a military hospital during the trial, flew in a helicopter from the court.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


A state-owned news channel, Nile News, reported that Mubarak suffered a heart attack. The Jerusalem Post could not confirm the veracity of the report. Mubarak has been rumored to have suffered heart attacks on a number of occasions since stepping down from his post amid protests in February 2011.

An Egyptian judge convicted Mubarak of complicity in the killings of protesters during the uprising that ended his 30-year rule.

It was the first time a deposed Arab leader had faced an ordinary court in person since a wave of uprisings shook the Arab world last year, sweeping away four entrenched rulers.



The ruling came at a politically fraught time for Egypt, two weeks before a run-off in its first free presidential election that will pit the Muslim Brotherhood, which was banned under Mubarak, against the deposed autocrat's last prime minister.



Mubarak, propped up on a hospital stretcher and wearing dark sunglasses, heard the verdict with a stony expression. He had been wheeled into the cage used in Egyptian courtrooms, while the other defendants stood.

Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak sits inside a cage in a courtroom in Cairo (Reuters)

Demonstrators outside the court, many of whom had been demanding the death penalty for Mubarak, greeted the verdict with fireworks and cries of "Allahu akbar (God is great)".

Soha Saeed, the wife of one of about 850 people killed in the street revolt that toppled Mubarak on Feb. 11, 2011, shouted: "I'm so happy. I'm so happy."

Some people inside the court who had wanted a death sentence scuffled with guards, decrying the Mubarak-era judiciary. "The people want the judiciary cleansed!" they chanted.


Judge Ahmed Refaat opened the proceedings by calling the start of Mubarak's trial on Aug. 3 a "historic day". He hailed Egyptians for removing the only leader many of them had known.

"The people of Egypt woke on Tuesday, Jan. 25, to a new dawn, hoping that they would be able to breathe fresh air ... after 30 years of deep, deep, deep darkness," he told the court.

Supporters of deposed president Hosni Mubarak react after a court sentenced him to life

Total silence fell over the courtroom in the moments before Refaat announced his verdict. The crowd outside then erupted in joy. Anti-Mubarak demonstrators and a smaller crowd of his supporters threw stones at each other and at police.

The judge also sentenced Mubarak's former interior minister, Habib al-Adli, to life in prison. He sentenced Mubarak's two sons Alaa and Gamal to time already served after convicting them on some corruption charges and acquitting them on others.

Gamal (L) and Alaa Mubarak, sons of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, stand inside a cage at a courtroom in Cairo (Reuters)

Six security officials were acquitted. Many Egyptians are angry that the hated police force, blamed for many of the deaths in the uprising, and other pillars of Mubarak's rule have survived his downfall intact.

A helicopter had flown Mubarak to the court on the outskirts of Cairo from the military-run hospital where he has been held in custody.



Egyptian state television said the prosecutor-general had ordered that Mubarak be transferred to prison from hospital to serve his sentence. No details were immediately given. His co-defendants have been held for months in a Cairo prison.

Hundreds of police with riot shields and batons surrounded the police academy where the 10-month trial has been held.

"Enough talk, we want execution!" protesters chanted outside before the verdict.

A noose is seen near police standing guard outside the police academy where former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak is on trial

Few Egyptians had expected Mubarak would go to the gallows, although protesters have often hung his effigy from lamp posts.

"I want nothing less than the death penalty for Mubarak. Anything less and we will not be silent and the revolution will break out again," Hanafi el-Sayed, whose 27-year-old son was killed early in the uprising, said just before the verdict. He had travelled from Alexandria for the trial.

In a June 16 and 17 run-off, Ahmed Shafiq, an ex-air force chief like Mubarak, will face the Brotherhood's Mohamed Mursi.

Shafiq has called his former boss a role model. His Islamist rival says that if he becomes president he will ensure enough evidence is produced to keep Mubarak behind bars for life.

"It is not possible to release Mubarak," Mursi told Reuters on Thursday. "I promise the martyrs (of the uprising) will retrieve their rights in full, God willing."

Related Content

August 21, 2018
Iran unveils fourth-generation fighter jet

By ANNA AHRONHEIM