UN report suggests Iran's satellite tech advancing ballistic missile program

The technology platform is based on a variant of the Shahab-3 ballistic missile, considered one of two Iranian missiles that may potentially be able to deliver a nuclear payload.

By JPOST.COM STAFF
June 11, 2015 13:59
1 minute read.
Iranian clerics watch the firing of a Shahab-3 missile during a war game in a desert near Qom

Iranian clerics watch the firing of a Shahab-3 missile during a war game in a desert near the city of Qom. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analysis from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

The launch of a space satellite by Iran's military may indicate the Islamic Republic's possession of ballistic missile technology, a United Nations panels of experts claimed.

According to Fox News, the panel, which on June 1 issued its findings on the February 15 launch, claimed that while Tehran official's “have not been reporting any new ballistic missile developments” or “unveiling or testing of new types of ballistic missiles,” the Islamic Republic intends to deploy three more satellites by March 16 which it hopes to propel “from more powerful launchers and on the back of bigger carriers.”

The technology platform used for these experiments is based on a variant of the Shahab-3 ballistic missile, which has a range of 1,000 miles and is considered one of two Iranian missiles that may potentially be able to deliver a nuclear payload.

Despite the findings of the panel, the issue of ballistic missile technology has been absent from the tenuous multilateral talks between Iran and the P5+1 nations.

The Obama administration did not include any stipulations regarding the powerful delivery system in last November's interim deal and since then has unfrozen billions of dollars of Iranian assets.

While the most recent experiment was only a partial success outwardly, its gains may suggest the possibility of a functional ballistic system. The satellite, bearing 110 lbs. [49 kg] freight meant for "image collecting" was meant to remain in orbit for 18 months, but plummeted after only 23 days.


Despite their apparent aerospace purpose, these experiments are in contradiction to United Nations sanctions resolutions.

As part of its sanctions regime pertaining to Iran, the UN forbids Iran from any activities “related to ballistic missiles capable of delivering nuclear weapons, including launches using ballistic missile technology.”

In comments from 2014, Iran's Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Khamenei, denounced any such expectations, calling them “stupid and idiotic," while urging his country to invest more in its missile development program.




Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders speaks to supporters in Pittsburgh
May 25, 2019
Bernie Sanders refuses to apologize for condemning armed conflict with Iran

By ZACHARY KEYSER