WATCH: Hidden underwater cameras reveal how animals drink water at Ramat Gan Safari

Zookeeper Elad Herskowitz placed cameras inside the water troughs of a number of animals at the Ramat Gan Safari.

By
February 18, 2015 18:45

How animals drink

How animals drink

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

For those of you who ever wondered how animals drink water, zookeeper Elad Herskowitz has finally answered your questions with a unique underwater-perspective video.

In collaboration with the Zoological Center of Tel Aviv, also known as the Ramat Gan Safari, Herskowitz placed cameras inside the water troughs of a number of animals at the site.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


In order of appearance, the cameras captured the unique ways that the Safari's giraffes, lions, oryx, lemurs, monkeys, tapirs, zebras and  rhinoceroses drank the good stuff.

The video was done as a way to promote Herskowitz's Go Fund Me campaign, in which he hopes to raise money to continue documenting life at the 860-acre safari, which he said is home to over 600 animals. "Unfortunately, the projects are slow because of lack of funds," he wrote in the campaign's description, saying that in the past, he has used special helicopters to capture the animals from an aerial perspective as well.

Related Content

Jerusalem Post News
July 19, 2018
This week in 60 seconds: Knesset passes controversial Jewish nation-state bill

By JPOST.COM STAFF