Massive swarm of jellyfish heading for Israeli coasts

According to a report from Walla, the swarm is moving swiftly north and may consist of tens of millions of jellyfish.

By JERUSALEM POST STAFF
July 4, 2019 12:42
1 minute read.
AT LEAST eight types of Jellyfish populate Israeli waters, most of which don’t sting

AT LEAST eight types of Jellyfish populate Israeli waters, most of which don’t sting. (photo credit: ZAFRIR KUPLIK)

 
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A swarm of jellyfish measuring hundreds of kilometers is nearing the Israeli coastline, preparing to wreak havoc on beach-goers and surfers enjoying the cool Mediterranean waters and escaping from the heat of the hot Middle Eastern sun.

According to a report from Walla, the swarm is moving swiftly north and may consist of tens of millions of jellyfish.

Nonetheless, while these marine creatures may sting, swimmers do not need to fear for their lives.

"There is no need or reason to panic," said Dr. Dor Adelist, a marine ecologist from the University of Haifa's Charney School of Maritime Studies, according to Walla. "It's important to say that science does not know of a single death from a jellyfish sting in the Mediterranean Sea."

Coast visitors can keep track of the jellyfish on the Israeli website meduzot.co.il, which is the Hebrew word for jellyfish.

If stung by a jellyfish, use seawater, not fresh water, to clean the affected area. Likewise, despite what the TV sitcom Friends may have led you to believe, human urine also does not effectively clean the area.

While getting stung by these creatures is not fun, jellyfish "have a role" in the marine ecology, explained Adelist. "They clean the sea, they serve as food for a great variety of marine creatures like sea turtles and fish - and the human being can also use them as healthy food - cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and in Israel people are already working on the innovative development of using their liquid to clean micro-plastic waste, for example, in wastewater treatment plants."

"It is reasonable to assume that by the end of July they will be here, and in August they will disappear from here and we will be able to return to the sea without fear," he said.


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