August 5: Totally meaningless

The pre-1967 borders were not very pleasant to live with; in fact, they were very dangerous for the tiny Jewish state, with the loss of many lives.

letters (photo credit: JP)
letters
(photo credit: JP)
Totally meaningless
Sir, – Regarding “PM will accept pre-’67 lines as baseline if PA accepts Israel as Jewish state” (August 3), the Palestinians are turning to the UN to seek recognition of statehood, and our prime minister, instead of staying strong, is running with his tail between his legs, showing fear and weakness.
If my memory is correct, the pre-1967 borders were not very pleasant to live with; in fact, they were very dangerous for the tiny Jewish state, with the loss of many lives.
The Palestinians feel the Jews are intruders and thieves, so what does their “recognition” mean? Not much!
BARBARA GINSBERG
Ma’aleh Adumim
Here’s to health!
Sir, – In his column blaming Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu and his Thatcherist economic views for all our problems, Gershon Baskin (“I should be a millionaire!,” Encountering Peace, August 2) states that we are forced to pay enormous amounts for insurance because the public health system is no longer sufficient.
As one who worked in the public health system for close to a quarter century and has personally benefited from the provisions of the public health system, I can inform him that health care, available by law to all Israelis, is as good as or better than that in any other country.
Private insurance is not essential and is taken out by those who, for various reasons, prefer treatment in the private sector. The availability of this sector started long before Netanyahu became prime minister and has grown a great deal due to the choices of many citizens.
MONTY M. ZION
Tel Mond
The writer is a retired physician
Sir, – Gershon Baskin writes that “even without the burden of housing expenses, we are forced to pay enormous amounts for insurance because the public health system is no longer sufficient.”
Excuse me? In what way is it not sufficient? My family, including my mother, with numerous severe health issues, does not pay extra for health insurance.
We all feel that the system here is the best and most equitable in the world, managing to provide universal coverage and maintain competition. I can say this with some knowledge since I’ve lived in many countries.
DIANA BARSHAW-RICH
Haifa
Not fair
Sir, – I recently contacted the authorities to exchange my old gas mask for a new one. I was told it would be brought to my home at a cost of NIS 25. I believe that the cost should be borne by the Ministry for Homefront Defense, but in light of the government’s budgetary problems I agreed.
Imagine my surprise when I was informed that the new mask would not be brought to my home, and that I was required to go to Tel Aviv or Beit Shemesh to make the exchange personally. The reason was my address – I was told that the service is not provided for those living beyond the Green Line.
I believe that it is improper for the government to discriminate in any way in providing essential services to citizens who meet all their obligations (army, taxes, etc.) solely because of their address. This policy is not only wrong (and in this case immoral), but it serves to further increase the problems of an already fractured society.

JAY SHAPIRO
Karnei Shomron

No pride in filth
Sir, – Having just returned from a nine-day, four-city tour of Eastern Europe, I noticed the stark contrast between the cleanliness of the capitals we visited and the filth that is evident on the sidewalks and streets of Jerusalem.
Lining the avenues and alleyways of Prague, Vienna, Bratislava and Budapest, one can observe scores of impeccably clean and inviting cafes. Compare that with the littered state of the food establishments that abound along our main boulevards and one has to wonder: Where is our pride?
CHAIM BEN-SHLOMO
Jerusalem