Anonymous hacks Russian federal agency, releases 360,000 documents

Documents released by the hacking group show that Russia is censoring the narrative regarding its role in its war with Ukraine.

Anonymous video message (photo credit: screenshot)
Anonymous video message
(photo credit: screenshot)

The Ukrainian Anonymous hacker group has hacked into Roskomnadzor, the Russian federal agency responsible for monitoring and censoring media, and released 360,000 files, the group announced on Twitter on Thursday.

Among the censored documents released by Anonymous, some of which are dated as late as March 5, are ones that show Moscow censored anything that referred to the war as a Russian invasion of Ukraine.

Read more about the Russia-Ukraine War:

Roskomnadzor blocked Russian use of Facebook after it flagged Russian articles as factually inaccurate. They are also threatening to block Russian Wikipedia for including an article on the Russian invasion.

A few days ago, Anonymous hacked several Russian broadcasts, interrupting their content and leaving messages saying that normal Russians don't support the war.

The masked face of international hacker Anonymous (credit: WIKIMEDIA)The masked face of international hacker Anonymous (credit: WIKIMEDIA)

Anonymous has been waging a cyberwar against Russia since February 24 when the invasion began. The group has taken credit for hacking multiple Russian government websites. They also opened a website where users could send emails to random Russians whose email addresses were stored in the database, and they encouraged users to "spread the truth about war in Ukraine."

On Wednesday, Anonymous denied a report that its website was hacked by pro-Russian hackers.