Israel Elections: 62% of Left want Arabs in government - poll

Blue and White would not cross the 3.25% electoral threshold.

Memebers of the Joint List party arrive to the Israeli President Reuven Rivlin to begin talks with political parties over who should form a new government, at his residence in Jerusalem, September 22, 2019 (photo credit: MENAHEM KAHANA/POOL VIA REUTERS)
Memebers of the Joint List party arrive to the Israeli President Reuven Rivlin to begin talks with political parties over who should form a new government, at his residence in Jerusalem, September 22, 2019
(photo credit: MENAHEM KAHANA/POOL VIA REUTERS)
A majority of Israelis who define themselves as left-wing want the Arab Joint List to be part of the next government, while the Right is split about the far-right Otzma Yehudit Party, a new poll found on Monday.
The survey, taken by Panels Research pollster Menachem Lazar, found that 62% of left-wingers want the Joint List in the government, 20% oppose it, and 18% said they had no opinion.
Among respondents who consider themselves right-wing, 37% said they favored Otzma Yehudit joining the government, 31% said they oppose the move, and 32% said they did not know.
If elections would be held now, the Likud would get 29 seats, Yesh Atid 18, New Hope 14, Yamina 13, Joint List nine, Shas eight, Yisrael Beytenu and United Torah Judaism seven each, Labor six, the Religious Zionist Party five and Meretz four, according to the poll. Blue and White would not cross the 3.25% electoral threshold.
 
Blue and White officials called the poll "an outlier" and said the party crosses the threshold in every other poll. They said Blue and White would remain in the election and play a central role in the next government, which they said would not be formed by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
Otzma Yehudit leader Itamar Ben-Gvir reacted to the poll by saying it proved that "right-wing voters have not been impressed by the Left's scare tactics and mudslinging and want me to be an influential minister."
The poll of 527 respondents representing a statistical sample of the Israeli population had a margin of error of 4.3%.