Holon institute hosts University of Maryland's chief scientist

Pierce and Yakubov expressed a mutual interest in deepening the relationship between HIT and the University of Maryland.

 FROM RIGHT: Dr. Brian M. Pierce, Prof. Eduard Yakubov, Dr. Eyal Brill and Dr. Harel Menashri (photo credit: TAL KIRSHENBAUM)
FROM RIGHT: Dr. Brian M. Pierce, Prof. Eduard Yakubov, Dr. Eyal Brill and Dr. Harel Menashri
(photo credit: TAL KIRSHENBAUM)

Dr. Brian M. Pierce, chief scientist and head of the Applied Research Laboratory for Intelligence and Security at the University of Maryland, visited the Holon Institute of Technology (HIT) on Thursday, meeting with senior management at the school to strengthen connections between Israeli and American cyber systems.

During the visit, Pierce learned about HIT’s expertise in cyber integration across various fields, including computer science, industrial engineering and technology management, and electrical and electronics engineering.  

He demonstrated interest in HIT’s multidisciplinary ventures and the collaborations between students and faculty members from the various faculties within the School of Multidisciplinary Studies. Pierce also expressed great interest in systems engineering, which he says is a vital field in the US.

HIT president Prof. Eduard Yakubov met with Pierce, together with members of the HIT administration, and noted that 90% of the students in HIT’s Faculty of Industrial Engineering and Technology Management plan to specialize in systems engineering. 

  HOLON INSTITUTE of Technology campus (credit: HIT) HOLON INSTITUTE of Technology campus (credit: HIT)

HIT, Maryland U to deepen relationship

Yakubov also spoke about the close relationship the institute maintains with industry and the community. 

“Our uniqueness lies in the institute’s DNA, which includes an emphasis on applied research, innovation and a multidisciplinary approach,” he said. 

At the conclusion of the meeting, Pierce and Yakubov expressed a mutual interest in deepening the relationship between HIT and the University of Maryland.