Simulation Creationism: Are we all living in an advanced simulation? - opinion

Nir Ziso: “Simulation Creationism takes Creationism out of its pseudo-scientific position while supplying powerful apologetic toolkits to believers worldwide.”

 Are we all living in a simulation? Is this the modern bridge of creationism? (Illustrative) (photo credit: PIXABAY)
Are we all living in a simulation? Is this the modern bridge of creationism? (Illustrative)
(photo credit: PIXABAY)

Silicon Valley has been infatuated by the Simulation Theory since Oxford University philosopher Nick Bostrom introduced the modern iteration of this idea that stretches back to the 17th century French philosopher Rene Descartes.

The theory has gained such notoriety that WIRED magazine even published a piece titled “Of course we’re living in a simulation” last March, and articles have recently appeared in The New York Times and Popular Mechanics.

The theory argues that the probability of advanced civilizations eventually simulating life is so high that we’re likely living in one of their simulations.

Prominent Silicon Valley thought leaders have gravitated toward the Simulation Theory, a surprising trend considering wider sentiment among liberal circles that positions monotheism and religion-based intelligent design as backward thinking.

Now, such luminaries fully believe in a creator – they just believe this creator happens to be human or human-adjacent. And it’s not just a few fringe thinkers attaching themselves to this theory. You may recognize one of its most high-profile proponents.

Elon Musk gestures during a conversation with legendary game designer Todd Howard (not pictured) at the E3 gaming convention in Los Angeles, California, U.S., June 13, 2019. (credit: REUTERS/MIKE BLAKE/FILE PHOTO)Elon Musk gestures during a conversation with legendary game designer Todd Howard (not pictured) at the E3 gaming convention in Los Angeles, California, U.S., June 13, 2019. (credit: REUTERS/MIKE BLAKE/FILE PHOTO)

Elon Musk, a firm advocate for this version of the theory, made waves by claiming on the Joe Rogan Experience podcast that “games will eventually be indistinguishable from reality.” Musk’s own projects like Neuralink put his advocacy into action, forging new ways for augmenting technology’s effect on the brain. Should Neuralink and similar projects gain more mainstream traction, it could suggest the attainability of a man made simulation of life in the future.

Global Architect Institute: A middle ground bridging Christian Creationism and Simulation Theory

In reality, this may be close to a Jewish or Christian perspective of how our world works and came to be. Religious Christian communities who noticed the similarity between Creationism and the Simulation Theory have a champion in a new institution that has emerged to bridge the gap between the technological and the divine.

The Global Architect Institute, a nonprofit organization unearthing newfound knowledge of Simulation Theory and Simulation Creationism, offers a new perspective and hypothesis to the public. The institute establishes a middle ground between the Simulation Theory’s more secular viewpoint with Creationism, the belief that life and reality originated with supernatural acts of divine creation.

Aligning closely with Christian literature, Simulation Creationism defines our world as a simulation created by God to study life on Earth, a concept that is quickly gaining traction with many faith-based communities. Developed by Nir Ziso and a team of leading theologians specializing in Christianity, the hypothesis brings new Bible-based testimony to verify the Simulation Theory with faith-based proof.

This theory arrives at a time when Christian religious affiliation is steadily decreasing in the United States, according to Pew Research. This decline in religion also encompasses a generational divide, with only 40% of Gen Z individuals in the US responding to having formative religious experiences. Despite the rise of non-affiliation, Christianity remains the most widely practiced religion in the world, with many denominations making a home in Israel.

The emergence of theories such as Simulation Creationism could have a profound impact on individuals who may be questioning their faith. By embodying a worldview that bridges religion and science, the hypothesis brings communities that are seemingly at odds under one umbrella. Though Simulation Creationism may sound divisive, it ultimately provides a way for religious and non-religious communities to find common ground in explaining the creation of our universe.

“For the first time, we uncover a detailed model showing the existence of a creator.”

Nir Ziso

“For the first time, we uncover a detailed model showing the existence of a creator,” says Ziso, director of the Global Architect Institute.

“Simulation Creationism takes Creationism out of its pseudo-scientific position while supplying powerful apologetic toolkits to believers worldwide.”

The hypothesis provides a values-based proposition built on religious texts that extends beyond the secular and pseudo-scientific explanations from scientists and Silicon Valley.

In essence, Simulation Creationism affirms that the universe didn’t emerge by chance and extensively details models which show the existence of a creator. As the confluence point between Creationism and the Simulation Theory, the hypothesis suggests that our reality and existence can be explained by assuming we are all part of a simulation whose objective is to research and monitor events related to creation and life.