Drones developed by Israeli students help the environment

Students from Shenkar developed two technological systems: A traveling drone system to cut transportation and delivery, and an image processor for kindergartens.

 The 'Dronet' system developed by Shenkar students.  (photo credit: ARIEL MEDINA)
The 'Dronet' system developed by Shenkar students.
(photo credit: ARIEL MEDINA)

Engineering students at Shenkar College of Engineering and Design in Ramat Gan have developed a number of systems set on making the lives of Israelis — and the environment — better. 

What did the students develop? 

Engineering students Dekal Menashe, Danit Noa Yehezkel and Keren Halpert developed the Dronet system which consists of four autonomous drones connected by an elastic network that they developed with the goal of transporting various loads in a convenient, efficient way.

They developed an app with which they can control a drone’s flight path and transport cargo in a safe and stable manner. The students said they simplified the procedure for the user so that one just uses a remote control to move the load. 

The system takes into account the six flight directions that drones have in the air and is based on Bluetooth.

Menashe, a student in the department, said that while several companies are developing drones to move goods, this new technique will allow the use of several drones to do so at the same time. 

New capabilities include extrication and rescue in inaccessible places and serving as a replacement for cranes. The system looks promising.

Protecting Israel's children

Students Sergey Belinov and Adi Yaari created an image processing system to help maintain the safety of children in kindergartens and give parents a sense of security. This is an image processing and real-time alerting system aimed at security and social skills research. 

It is a system of cameras located throughout each kindergarten, which help monitor kids at nursery school, prevent kids from leaving without an escort, and prevent the entry of unauthorized strangers.

The cameras detect positive and negative interactions on the children's faces which are transmitted directly to the app, and real-time updates and alerts are sent to staff and parents.

"The system is based on automatic cameras. In this way, a daily attendance update isn't required. The new security capabilities give parents a sense of security," said Belinov.

"The system is based on automatic cameras. In this way, a daily attendance update isn't required. The new security capabilities give parents a sense of security."

Sergey Belinov

Yaari added: "We would be happy if the system would be used in every Israeli kindergarten in Israel. It can help expand research in the field of social relations between kids and strengthen the sense of security among parents."