Holocaust Survivor’s Assistance Program receives $10m. in funds

Approximately one-third of the Holocaust survivors in the US are estimated to be living in poverty, according to the JFNA.

 A committee meeting in July 2020. (photo credit: WIKIPEDIA)
A committee meeting in July 2020.
(photo credit: WIKIPEDIA)

The House Appropriations Committee on Wednesday released the report for the labor, health and human services and education appropriations bill, including a $10 million allocation to the Holocaust Survivor’s Assistance Program.

The announcement comes on the heels of Holocaust Survivor Day, which was commemorated on Sunday. The Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA) said they expect the allocation will pass by the full committee and urged the full House and Senate to follow suit in supporting the $10m. funding level for the “critical” program.

What is the Holocaust Survivor Assistance Program?

The Holocaust Survivor Assistance Program is a public-private partnership between the Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Community Living, JFNA, and community-based health and supportive services providers to better address the unique needs of the country’s aging Holocaust survivor population, the organization said.

“It has led innovations in person-centered, trauma-informed (PCTI) care for Holocaust survivors and their family caregivers, an approach JFNA is further developing to serve diverse older populations impacted by trauma,” the Federations said in a statement following the announcement of the allocation.

 From L to R: Euro-Asian Jewish Congress president Dr. Michael Mirilashvili, Diaspora head Margarita Spitzko Shane, JFNA president and CEO Eric Fingerhut. (credit: MARC ISRAEL SELLEM/THE JERUSALEM POST) From L to R: Euro-Asian Jewish Congress president Dr. Michael Mirilashvili, Diaspora head Margarita Spitzko Shane, JFNA president and CEO Eric Fingerhut. (credit: MARC ISRAEL SELLEM/THE JERUSALEM POST)

the Federations said in a statement following the announcement of the allocation.

“Nearly 90% of older adults in the United States have been exposed to at least one traumatic event, including those who have experienced violence and oppression, military veterans, first responders, refugees and survivors of childhood and domestic violence, abuse and man-made or natural disasters,” the statement reads.

“Jewish Federations commend the House Appropriations Committee’s proposed $10m. in funding for the Holocaust Survivors Assistance Program, an increase from the current $6m.,” said SVP for public affairs Elana Broitman. “Holocaust survivors, older adults affected by trauma and their caregivers face unique challenges and deserve dignity and support, which is why Jewish Federations advocated for bolstering this important program.”

According to JFNA, approximately one third of the Holocaust survivors in the US are estimated to be living in poverty. “As a group, Holocaust survivors are subject to increased risk of depression, social isolation and extremely poor outcomes if they don’t receive the proper care,” the organization said. 

“As a group, Holocaust survivors are subject to increased risk of depression, social isolation, and extremely poor outcomes if they don’t receive the proper care.”

Jewish Federation of North America