Some Jews who have left Ukraine now study their religion in Warsaw

Some of the refugees traveled 30 hours via coach to get to Warsaw and receive assistance from the organization.

 Despite the fighting, Ukrainian Jews learn Judaism, in Warsaw. (photo credit: LIMMUD FSU)
Despite the fighting, Ukrainian Jews learn Judaism, in Warsaw.
(photo credit: LIMMUD FSU)

More than 100 Jewish people, as of Friday, who have fled Ukraine as a result of its war against Russia, have now begun to learn more about their own religion in Warsaw as refugees from the conflict, according to the Limmud FSU organization.

Limmud FSU (Former Soviet Union) is an international Jewish education organization that "focuses on giving young Russian-speaking Jewish adults the opportunity to revitalize and restore Jewish learning and to strengthen Jewish identity in their communities," their website states.

“It is a very special and meaningful Limmud FSU event for me personally,” reflected the organization’s co-founder, Sandy Cahn. “It is a monumental feat for us to gather Ukrainian Jews from across Europe, from Israel [and] from Ukraine itself."

About 100 volunteers from the organization gathered in the Polish capital and gave sessions to the refugees on multiple topics. Participants went on tours of Jewish Warsaw and the Museum of the History of Polish Jews.

"Participants really want to have a Limmud conference like those they remember, replete with learning sessions, fun, meaning, spirituality," Cahn said. "If we can provide this, it makes me so happy.”

Despite the fighting, Ukrainian Jews learn Judaism, in Warsaw.. (credit: LIMMUD FSU)Despite the fighting, Ukrainian Jews learn Judaism, in Warsaw.. (credit: LIMMUD FSU)

Many traveled from afar

Some of the refugees traveled 30 hours via coach to get to Warsaw and receive assistance from the organization.

"Participants really want to have a Limmud conference like those they remember, replete with learning sessions, fun, meaning, spirituality."

Sandy Cahn

“People in Ukraine are suffering,” said one participant. “We are without water, without electricity, without basic goods.”

Limmud FSU founder Chaim Chesler said that it's a "really special seminar. We can show that we care about our volunteers. We are giving them ammunition – ideological ammunition, educational ammunition, ammunition from the joy of being together.”