Ashkelon sends 2,000 reusable face masks to Baltimore's Jewish community

The move is part of an ongoing partnership between the two cities, who have been twin cities since 2003.

Ashkelon Mayor Tomer Glam (right) is seen posing with face masks sent to the Jewish community of Baltimore. (photo credit: ASHKELON MUNICIPALITY)
Ashkelon Mayor Tomer Glam (right) is seen posing with face masks sent to the Jewish community of Baltimore.
(photo credit: ASHKELON MUNICIPALITY)
The Ashkelon Municipality has sent 2,000 face masks to members of the Jewish community in Baltimore as the city continues to grapple with the coronavirus pandemic.
The face masks are reusable, and have the phrase "Stronger Together" written on the front.
The move is part of an ongoing partnership between the two cities, who have been twin cities since 2003. Since then, the Baltimore-Ashkelon partnership – which is facilitated by The Associated, the Jewish federation of Baltimore – has seen members of the two communities visit each other frequently. According to the Jewish Agency, young Ashkelon residents visit Baltimore every year to learn about the Jewish Diaspora. In addition, over 1,000 Jewish residents of Baltimore visit Ashkelon annually for various programs that focus on topics such as leadership development, multigenerational engagement, community immersion and cultural education.
Additionally, the partnership has seen the communities help each other in times of crisis. In the past, whenever Ashkelon was under threat due to violence and rockets, the Baltimore Jewish community would send over emergency vehicles and equipment, monetary aid and games to keep children entertained in bomb shelters.
"This is the first time that the two communities are experiencing a crisis at the same time," Ashkelon Mayor Tomer Glam said in a statement.
He added that "this is an opportunity for the city of Ashkelon to send support and love to the Jewish community there, because together we are stronger and together we will win and overcome this crisis."
The coronavirus pandemic has spread across the world, but has hit the United States the hardest. The country currently suffers from over three million infected. At the time of writing, Baltimore has recorded 9,153 cases, as part of the 75,016 total number of cases in the state of Maryland, according to the Baltimore-based Johns Hopkins University.