Israeli volunteers in Moldova aiding Ukrainian refugees

A delegation of some 40 Israeli doctors and medical staff was organized by Lema'anam to provide treatment to refugees on the Moldovan border.

 The Israeli humanitarian delegation sent to Moldova by LeMa'anam (photo credit: LEMA'ANAM)
The Israeli humanitarian delegation sent to Moldova by LeMa'anam
(photo credit: LEMA'ANAM)

A delegation of Israeli doctors and medical staff landed in Moldova last week to provide immediate treatment to Ukrainian refugees fleeing their nation following Russia's invasion.

The delegation of some 40 medical professionals and volunteers was organized by Lema'anam (For Their Sake), an Israeli NGO dedicated to providing medical treatment to Holocaust survivors.

The medical team in Moldova consists mostly of Ukrainian speakers from a wide variety of fields, including psychiatry, psychology, intensive care, orthopedics, pediatrics and even medical clowns and social workers.

Ichilov Hospital in Tel Aviv has given Lema'anam logistic backing, providing the delegation with necessary medical equipment.

The delegation, whose arrival was coordinated with Moldova's government, is based on the Moldovan side of the border with Ukraine, aiding refugees in camps around Chișinău.

 The Israeli humanitarian delegation sent to Moldova by LeMa'anam (credit: LEMA'ANAM) The Israeli humanitarian delegation sent to Moldova by LeMa'anam (credit: LEMA'ANAM)

The civilian-led campaign to aid Ukrainian refugees in Moldova represents a change for Lema'anam's operations, since it is mostly focused on providing free medical care to Holocaust survivors in Israel.

As an NGO dedicated to helping Holocaust survivors, Lema'anam "could not stand idly by as Ukrainians are oppressed and tortured," founder Dr. Tamara Kolitz said.

As a people persecuted in the Holocaust, the Jewish people "have a moral and human obligation to provide aid to the Ukrainians, who experienced terrible events," she said.

"It is our duty to be here and represents a natural progression of our daily activities back in Israel."

Kolitz added that the humanitarian work done by the Israeli government and civilians makes her "proud to be a female, Jewish Israeli doctor who can work for others, not just in Israel."