Russian missile supplies running low, Ukrainian intel says

As Russia's weapon supply runs lower and lower by the day, they have no choice but to ask for help from allies with supplies - or worse - retreat.

 9М723 missiles, part of Iskander-M missile complex, are seen during a demonstration at the International military-technical forum ARMY-2019 at Alabino range in Moscow Region, Russia June 25, 2019. (photo credit: MAXIM SHEMETOV/REUTERS)
9М723 missiles, part of Iskander-M missile complex, are seen during a demonstration at the International military-technical forum ARMY-2019 at Alabino range in Moscow Region, Russia June 25, 2019.
(photo credit: MAXIM SHEMETOV/REUTERS)

Ukrainian forces are becoming increasingly more confident that Russia's arsenal of missiles is decreasing by the day, with the Ukrainian Directorate of Intelligence (GUR) reporting this week that Moscow has less than 130 Iskander missiles still available.

GUR points to desperate moves from Russia to extend its arsenal of weapons. While supplies have been running low, Russia has reached out to Iran in the hopes of being able to gain access to a full supply of ballistic missiles.

Ukrainian intelligence officials have estimated that Russia has used at least 80% of its arsenal of missiles to attack crucial infrastructure within Ukraine. A large percentage of these missiles were said to be aimed at civilian targets across the beleaguered country.

Foreign states considering selling weapons to Russia

NATO reported an increase in weapon supply from Iran to Russia. "We see Iran offering drones and considering ballistic missile deliveries to Russia," NATO secretary-general Jens Stoltenberg said at a news conference in Istanbul. "This is unacceptable. No country should provide support to Moscow in this illegal war."

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg attends a press conference after a meeting to prepare the upcoming Madrid summit of the alliance, in The Hague, Netherlands, June 14, 2022. (credit: REUTERS/EVA PLEVIER)NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg attends a press conference after a meeting to prepare the upcoming Madrid summit of the alliance, in The Hague, Netherlands, June 14, 2022. (credit: REUTERS/EVA PLEVIER)

Ukrainian Defense Minister Oleksii Reznikov claimed that Russia was depleting its high-precision missile arsenal. He claimed that Russia only has 124 Iskander surface-to-surface missiles left.

Reznikov also alleged on Friday that Russia was seeking to purchase several thousand more suicide drones from Iran.  

Sale of Iranian drones to Russia

Ukrainian, American and UK officials have alleged that Iran has been selling Shahed series kamikaze drones and Mohajer-6 reconnaissance drones to Russia since at least August, which both Iranian and Russian officials have vehemently denied.

Iranian Foreign Minister Hossein Amirabdullahian told his Portuguese counterpart over the weekend that Iran did not sell drones or any weapons to either party to the conflict.

"We believe that arming either side will prolong the war, and we do not think that war is the right way," Amirabdullahian said according to Maariv.

Iran's aid to Russia has not been limited to munitions. Iranian instructors are allegedly overseeing Russian forces launching kamikaze drones from within annexed Ukrainian territory, the Ukrainian National Resistance Center claimed on Wednesday.

Despite rumors of weapon sales over the previous months, Iran still claims innocence, stating that they have not sold any kind of weapon to either side of the conflict so as to not prolong the problem.