Jellyfish season in Israel: What to do if you get stung

Magen David Adom (MDA) paramedic Aryeh Myers gave some helpful advice on what to do if one comes in contact with a jellyfish.

Nomad jellyfish (Rhopilema nomadica) (photo credit: Ori~/ATTRIBUTION/VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS)
Nomad jellyfish (Rhopilema nomadica)
(photo credit: Ori~/ATTRIBUTION/VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS)

Summer has officially arrived in Israel, and with it comes sunny days at the beach. It is also, however, jellyfish season. Magen David Adom (MDA) paramedic Aryeh Myers provided some useful tips on what to do if one comes in contact with a jellyfish in a tweet on Thursday.

The first thing Myers noted was that the species of jellyfish in Israel's waters are not life-threatening. However, he said, "they can leave a sting and it can hurt."

What should you do after getting stung by a jellyfish?

"First of all, identify the area of the sting," Myers said. "Look for red skin or perhaps blisters. If you find it, wash it off with seawater or with vinegar. In Israel, you can find vinegar in the lifeguard huts. Make sure you don't rub the area or you don't use any sweet water to wash it off. Seawater is best."

What if you get stung in the eye?

"If the sting is in the eyes, make sure you don't use vinegar, of course, but you can still use the sea water followed by other water," Myers said. "If the sting is very, very widespread, call MDA on 101 and an ambulance will be sent to you for help."

Israelis enjoy the beach in Tel Aviv, July 15, 2020 (credit: MIRIAM ALSTER/FLASH90)Israelis enjoy the beach in Tel Aviv, July 15, 2020 (credit: MIRIAM ALSTER/FLASH90)

More about Israel's jellyfish

The most common species of jellyfish on Israel's coast is the nomad jellyfish, according to Backpack Israel. These jellyfish, however, are not native to the region. Orginally found only in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, nomad jellyfish crossed the Suez Canal and entered the Mediterranean Sea, where they have become an invasive species.

There are 16 other species of jellyfish in Israel's waters, according to AngloList.