Eight dehydrated hikers rescued amid heatwave

Due to the heatwave, the National Parks Authority closed down some of the national parks in the interest of keeping trekkers safe, advising them to stay out of open areas with no shade.

 A hiker is seen being rescued in of the Nature and Park Authority reserves. (photo credit: NATURE AND PARKS AUTHORITY)
A hiker is seen being rescued in of the Nature and Park Authority reserves.
(photo credit: NATURE AND PARKS AUTHORITY)
A number of hikers needed to be rescued amid this weekend's heatwave, after the National Parks Authority (NPA) opened up parks and nature reserves after closing down during the coronavirus outbreak.
Park authorities rescued eight dehydrated hikers on Saturday, some on the verge of fainting. The authorities led them to a safe place to await the arrival of Magen David Adom for further treatment. 
In one rescue, an IDF helicopter was needed to remove one hiker who fell. 

Due to the heatwave, the NPA closed down some of the national parks in the interest of keeping trekkers safe, advising them to stay out of open areas with no shade. 
IDF Search and Rescue rescuing a hiker succumbed to dehydration amid the heatwave.
According to the NPA, many people heeded the advice, but the heat still took its toll and during the weekend, leading to the need for rescue missions.
The NPA prepared to open nature reserves this week in accordance with Health Ministry directives, such as placing rescue teams at each of the parks and safely opening areas with water pools. 
"Many hiking trails were closed due to the intense heat wave, most travelers obeyed warning and visited notable water sites such as Nahal David," said Raya Shurkey, director of the public and community division of the NPA. 
This week marks the second week of Israel's national parks and reserves being open after the coronavirus lockdown, and despite the overwhelming heatwave, more than 30,000 people set out enjoy the outdoors. 

Thousands visited parks and nature reserves in notable areas such as the Hermon Stream Nature Reserve, otherwise known as the Banias Nature Reserve which had 1200 trekkers, Ein Gedi with 1100, Yarkon Tel Afek with 1600, Harod Spring and Eshkol Park with 800 trekkers each.
In addition to the parks and nature reserves, overnight camping areas were also opened. 
"This weekend we opened our overnight camp sites, and within a few hours the within just a few hours reservations were filled," said Shurkey.

Additionally during the weekend park authorities together with fire crews handled fires that broke out in the Lachish Moshav, in southern Israel, a total of 10,000 acres were burned. Authorities suspect potential arson.