Policeman kicked out of a supermarket, owner suspected of discrimination

Baffled by the experience, the officer called Eilat local police to the scene. When two local officers arrived, they too were refused entry by the owner.

Israel Police officers oversee people wearing masks in Jerusalem (photo credit: MARC ISRAEL SELLEM/THE JERUSALEM POST)
Israel Police officers oversee people wearing masks in Jerusalem
(photo credit: MARC ISRAEL SELLEM/THE JERUSALEM POST)
An unusual incident took place in Eilat after a man on vacation was kicked out of a supermarket after mentioning to the cashier that he was a police officer, according to a report by N12. 
During a standard visit to a supermarket, a police officer who was wearing civilian clothes encountered a sign in front of the shop that read: "We don't sell to police." Surprised, the officer asked the cashier about the meaning of the sign, who responded by asking the customer whether he was a policeman. After saying that he was, the cashier allegedly kicked him out, screaming: "Get out! I don't sell to police."
Baffled by the experience, the officer called Eilat local police to the scene. When two local officers arrived, they too were refused entry by the owner. One officer was recorded saying, "you're confused ... This is a public area."
Police later learned that the involved cashier was the shop owner's son. The shop owner in turn claimed that the sign was put up without of his knowledge by his son or by another one of his employees, and that he would have never approved of the act had he been aware.
"It wasn't me who put up the sign," the shop owner told N12. "Someone else put it up. I didn't let the police officers in because they were threatening me. I love the police and have no issues with them."
Following the publications the police announced that it opened an investigation against the shop owner, who is suspected of discrimination.
Public criticism of police brutality has seen a dramatic increase in recent weeks.
Earlier in July Public Security Minister Amir Ohana asked Attorney General Avichai Mandelblit to allow Israel Police to publish the full body cam footage from incidents, following a string of reports alleging police brutality against people not wearing masks.
The recent protests taking place on a weekly basis outside of the Prime Minister's Official Residence on Balfour street in Jerusalem led to even more claims of police brutality after police started using water cannons to disperse protesters, injuring several of them in the process.