Jordanian government: return of enclaves resounding diplomatic victory

Press report released indicates ongoing perception of “Cold Peace” between Israel and Jordan after 25 years of peace

AN IDF soldier patrols the border area between Israel and Jordan at Naharayim, as seen from the Israeli side on October 22. (photo credit: RONEN ZVULUN/REUTERS)
AN IDF soldier patrols the border area between Israel and Jordan at Naharayim, as seen from the Israeli side on October 22.
(photo credit: RONEN ZVULUN/REUTERS)
A press release provided by the Jordanian government notes the return of the enclaves, referring to them by their Arabic names of “Al-Baqoura” (“Naharayim” in Hebrew) and “Al-Ghamar” (“Tzofar” in Hebrew), as a “diplomatic victory over Israel,” despite the fact that it was an important element of the Israel- Jordan peace agreement, which was signed in 1994.
Jordan’s decision not to renew the Israeli lease over the enclaves took effect on November 10. At the opening of the 4th session of the Jordanian parliament, Abdullah said he would extend Jordanian sovereignty “over each inch of those lands.”
The speaker of the Jordanian parliament, Faisal Al-Fayez, said that the reclamation "victory for Jordan's diplomatic will, represented by King Abdullah II, which confirms Jordan's sovereignty over all its lands..."
Al-Fayez further added that the decision by Jordan’s King was "an impressive and firm response to all those who question our national positions and our ability to defend our rights, our principles and the supreme interests of our country."
The Jordanian press issued much praise for the King’s decision, while also harshly criticizing Israel in the process. One paper said that the enclaves "had fallen prey to foreign settlers who arrived like ravens bearing evil tidings." Another paper called Israel “an arrogant occupying state.”
Despite the existence of a peace treaty between the two countries, society to society relations have remained poor. Jordanians of Palestinian origin allegedly account for 70% of the total population of 9.7 million, largely descendants of those who left in 1948 and 1967, with almost two million living in refugee camps.


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