Peace Index: Annexation as likely as two-state solution

The survey also found that the majority of the Jewish public (53%) reject the solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict of establishing an independent Palestinian state alongside Israel.

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April 29, 2019 03:46
1 minute read.
A Jewish settler walks at the Jewish settlement outpost of Adei Ad B in the West Bank

A Jewish settler walks at the Jewish settlement outpost of Adei Ad B in the West Bank. (photo credit: REUTERS/NIR ELIAS)

 
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Israelis believe it is equally as likely that an independent Palestinian state will be created alongside Israel as it is that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will annex Area C of the West Bank, according to the most recent Peace Index.

The survey, published Sunday by Tel Aviv University’s Evens Program in Mediation and Conflict Management and the Migdam Consulting and Research Institute, found that when it comes to solutions to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict that have a chance of being realized in the foreseeable future, close to half (43%) of the Jewish public believe that nothing will change. Another 22% could see a Palestinian state being created alongside the Jewish state, and 20% could see annexation of the territories with limited rights for Palestinians taking place.

The survey also found that the majority of the Jewish public (53%) reject the solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict of establishing an independent Palestinian state alongside Israel. Some 40% support the solution, as do 68% of the Arab public.

Creation of a bi-national state was supported by 10% and rejected by 83% of the Jewish public, but received the support of 59% of Arab participants, while 27% of Arabs were opposed.

And what about annexation?

Just days before Israel was to hold national elections, Netanyahu promised to “extend sovereignty” over parts of the West Bank, adding that he would not “differentiate between the settlement blocs and isolated settlements.”


The campaign promise was seen as a last-minute bid to draw right-wing votes in a tight election race. Tel Aviv University asked if the Jewish public would support this annexation. Some 60% of the Jewish public rejected the idea, while more than one-third (34%) supported it.

The survey comes just more than a month before the expected revelation of US President Donald Trump’s “Deal of the Century,” which is expected to be published shortly after the June 4 conclusion of Ramadan. Nearly one-third (32%) of the Jewish public believes this “deal” will harm Israeli vital interests.

Some 24% of the Jewish public believe it will advance Israeli interests, 22% believe it will not affect Israeli interests.

The survey was conducted by telephone and Internet between April 14 and 15. The maximum margin of error is +/-4.1% at a confidence level of 95%.

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