Tunisia premier faces no-confidence vote over new govt

By REUTERS
July 30, 2016 20:04
1 minute read.

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

Tunisia's Prime Minister Habib Essid faces a vote of no confidence in parliament on Saturday after resisting the president's proposal to help form a new unity government to push through economic reforms.

Essid, a technocrat who came to office less than two years ago, has been under fire for slow progress on a financial reforms package to create growth and jobs, initiatives demanded by Tunisia's multilateral lenders.

President Beji Caid Essebsi has called for a new unity government to overcome political divisions in the ruling coalition of four parties and respond more quickly to economic and security challenges.

Most lawmakers are expected to vote in favour of sacking Essid. Islamist party Ennahda, the largest party in parliament, and Essebsi's secular Nidaa Tounes party, have said they will vote against the premier.

"I never opposed the president's proposal," Essid told lawmakers in parliament. "But it was put forward at a difficult time for the country and has caused the delay in several key projects and laws."

Since its 2011 revolution to oust Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, Tunisia has emerged as a democracy praised as a model for the region. But militant attacks have tested the government and political infighting has slowed economic progress.

Essebsi has said the country needs a more dynamic government ready to take audacious decisions to bring about the liberalisation and cost-cutting required for an overhaul of the North African state's economy.

Three Islamist militant attacks last year - including gun attacks on foreign visitors at a museum and a beach resort - have badly damaged the tourism industry, which makes up around 8 percent of the economy and is a major source of jobs.

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

Breaking news
September 18, 2018
Jerusalem Post closed for Yom Kippur

By JERUSALEM POST STAFF