Adas Israel synagogue 'takes a ride' through Washington

The original synagogue was opened in 1876. President Ulysses S. Grant attended the opening.

By
January 9, 2019 19:27
Adas Israel synagogue 'takes a ride' through Washington

The new Capital Jewish Museum. (photo credit: YOU TUBE)

 
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Washington’s Capital Jewish Museum, which will be housed in the historic Adas Israel synagogue building, is set to open in two years, but its physical structure was moved on Wednesday in order to prepare for it.

The Adas Israel synagogue was moved a block down G Street Northwest, aided by an attentive construction crew and more than a dozen sets of wheels. According to reports, a rabbi gave a traveler’s blessing in Hebrew nearby.

The original synagogue was opened in 1876 and President Ulysses S. Grant attended the opening.


The new museum will include several historical artifacts, including a lace collar worn by Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a banner carried by Jewish lobbyist Hyman Bookbinder during the 1963 March on Washington, and a law school notebook used by Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis.

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