Philly woman turns swastika graffiti into artwork

“We have lived here for almost 20 years. I have happily raised my kids and celebrated the openness and safety of this town,” she wrote on Facebook. “I am so saddened by this occurrence."

By JPOST.COM STAFF
August 30, 2016 13:26
swastika

Spray-painted swastika (illustrative). (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
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A Jewish artist in suburban Philadelphia turned swastikas painted on her trash can into a neighborhood demonstration of love and caring.

Esther Cohen-Eskin of Havertown discovered the Nazi symbol painted on her trash can on Aug. 19, The Huffington Post reported.

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“We have lived here for almost 20 years. I have happily raised my kids and celebrated the openness and safety of this town,” she wrote on Facebook. “I am so saddened by this occurrence.”

Cohen-Eskin didn't let the swastika stay for long, instead, at the suggestion of a friend she painted the swastika and transformed it into an orange flower in order to “turn this symbol of hate into something beautiful."




She then posted a message on Facebook and dropped letters in her neighbors mailboxes encouraging them to paint their trash cans with messages of love.

She asked her neighbors first to paint a swastika on their bins, then deliberately paint over it, she said, with “a flower, a peace sign, an animal, a doodle... anything your imagination can come up with.”



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