Iconic Prague Synagogue gets first new Torahs since World War II

Before World War Two, there were about 125,000 Jews living in what is now the Czech Republic. About 80,000 were killed during the war.

By REUTERS
March 20, 2017 12:31
1 minute read.

Prague's Old-New Synagogue gets first new Torahs since World War II (credit: REUTERS)

Prague's Old-New Synagogue gets first new Torahs since World War II (credit: REUTERS)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

Prague's medieval Old-New Synagogue received two new Torah scrolls on Sunday, the first ones since World War Two shattered the country's once-thriving Jewish community.

The Torahs, funded by donations to the Prague Jewish community, were written in Israel and brought into the synagogue in a ceremony that included scripting of the final letters by guests and members of the community, and a street dance.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


"After years when Torahs were being destroyed, burnt ... the community today celebrates with its rabbi a new Torah scroll after many, many years. That is the best expression of the development of the Prague Jewish community," said deputy head of the Jewish Community of Prague, Frantisek Banyai.

The Old-New Synagogue is over 700 years old, one of the oldest existing synagogues in Europe. Apart from its significance to the community, it is the main attraction of Prague's Jewish Town, a popular destination for visitors.

Before World War Two, there were about 125,000 Jews living in what is now the Czech Republic. About 80,000 were killed during the war.

The Czech Federation of Jewish Communities estimates 15-20,000 Jews live in the Czech Republic now, although only about a quarter is registered with Jewish communities or other Jewish groups.

Related Content

Chicago
August 21, 2018
Alleged Iranian spies arrested for ‘surveilling Jewish facilities’ in US

By MICHAEL WILNER