Watch: Suspected Nazi hideout discovered deep in Argentine jungle

Archaeologists discover ruins containing WWII era Nazi artifacts.

By JPOST.COM STAFF
March 23, 2015 09:46
1 minute read.
An archaeologist explores

An archaeologist explores [file]. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
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Argentinian archaeologists may have discovered a secret Nazi hideout deep in the jungles of the South American nation, AFP reported on Sunday, citing local media.

Archaeologists suspect that the ruins of three buildings in the Teyu Cuare park in the north of the country were part of a Nazi hideout built by German Nazis, AFP cited the Clarin newspaper as reporting.
 


The archaeologists discovered German artifacts from the World War II era in the buildings, adding to their belief that Nazis were behind the construction of the building. 

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"Apparently, halfway through the Second World War, the Nazis had a secret project of building shelters for top leaders in the event of defeat -- inaccessible sites, in the middle of deserts, in the mountains, on a cliff or in the middle of the jungle like this," Daniel Schavelzon, from the University of Buenos Aires told Clarin.

The researchers believe, however, that, the Nazis never ended up using the hideout.

Argentina let in a number of Nazi fugitives following World War II, including Adolf Eichmann, who was captured by Israeli commandos in the South American country and brought back to the Jewish State where he was executed.

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