A musical journey back to the Holy Temple

By SHARON AHARONI
April 27, 2016 17:45
4 minute read.
Hebrew Music Museum

A view of the Europe-Ashkenaz room. (photo credit: HEBREW MUSIC MUSEUM)

 
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In Jerusalem paid a visit to the new Hebrew Music Museum to bring you a sneak peek of this first-of-its-kind spot in the city center, offering an interactive journey through the world of Hebrew music.

Museum director Eldad Levi, the musician who initiated the project, believes that Hebrew music, as opposed to Israeli music, can be traced back to the Holy Temple. Even though Jewish music departed from the Holy Land when the Jews were forced to flee to the Diaspora, much is shared between all Jewish musical traditions throughout the world. Jewish music from Iraq, Syria, Morocco, Europe or elsewhere has a common denominator – connecting people to God. Though the sounds and instruments may be different, the texts, te’amim (cantillation notes) and piyyutim (para-liturgical songs) are much the same.

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