Employment integration...

... and the Jerusalem intifada.

By MARIK SHTERN MARIK SHTERN / JERUSALEM INSTITUTE FOR POLICY RESEARCH / EN.JERUSALEMINSTITUTE.ORG.IL
March 2, 2017 16:10
2 minute read.
Jerusalem unemployment

Recipients of unemployment benefits and income support in Jerusalem, 2010-2015. (photo credit: JERUSALEM INSTITUTE FOR POLICY RESEARCH)

 
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Since the end of the second intifada and construction of the separation fence, the economic and employment integration of Jerusalem’s Palestinian residents within west Jerusalem has been on the increase.

The demographic growth of the city’s Palestinian population, on the one hand, and the economic crisis in east Jerusalem caused by the separation fence and consequent disconnection from the Palestinian economy on the other, resulted in the integration of this population group into the Israeli labor market on a scale and scope unprecedented since 1967. Newly available data of the National Insurance Institute – as processed by the Jerusalem Institute for Policy Research in relation to the composition and characteristics of persons employed in Jerusalem from 2006 to 2015 – reveal that in 2015, the increase in the number of Arab workers was halted, for the first time ever, and even reversed slightly.

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