JCHATing

The OU Center launches initiatives to ease the way for English-speaking olim.

By KEREN PREISKEL
March 2, 2017 16:00
4 minute read.
The Soulful Sounds of Nuriel

The Soulful Sounds of Nuriel featuring the Attias brothers performs at the Hanukka celebration. (photo credit: RIKKI LIFF)

 
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When local Jerusalemites think of the Orthodox Union Israel Center in downtown Jerusalem, the tendency is to think of activities for Jerusalem’s older Anglo community and of Torah Tidbits, its weekly Torah publication in English.

While the OU Center is continuing its traditional popular activities, it is also launching new initiatives to reach out to young professional olim (new immigrants). With this in mind, the center, which has been operating in Israel for more than 35 years, has spearheaded the creation of JCHAT – the Jerusalem Community Hub for Anglos and Torah – a new division of OU Israel targeting professionals between the ages of 25 and 45, seeking to provide them with hizuk (reinforcement), shiurim (religious lectures), social events, rabbinic mentorship and guidance, and a sense of community as they continue to build their lives in Jerusalem.

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