British inquiry launched on anti-Semitism in UK

By
November 17, 2005 00:29
1 minute read.

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

Anti-Semitism is on the rise in Britain, with the number of incidents at their highest level for a generation, the chairman of an influential Parliamentary committee said Wednesday. The Parliamentary Committee Against Anti-Semitism has ordered an all-party inquiry into the extent and nature of contemporary anti-Semitism. Inquiry chairman, the former Europe minister Denis MacShane, said there is evidence that many British Jews "are living with an unacceptable level of anxiety and discomfort as a result of a perceptible rise in anti-Semitism." Community Safety Trust, a group representing Britain's Jewish community, says there were 532 anti-Semitic incidents - defined as malicious acts toward the Jewish community - last year. The incidents - which included physical attacks, name calling, hate mail and the desecration of property, such as the vandalism of synagogues with swastikas - represented a 42 percent increase on 2003 figures and were well above the previous high of 405 in 2000. The inquiry is seeking written submissions and will also interview witnesses before reporting in the spring.

Related Content

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Russian President Vladimir Putin speak during their meeting
August 18, 2018
Merkel, Putin tackle Syria and Iran in meeting outside Berlin

By REUTERS