Hebrew University receives USAID grant to boost crop yields

The grant, whose application was facilitated by the New York-based American Friends of Hebrew University, will enable the establishment of a Unit of Correlative Microscopy at Rehovot campus.

By
March 5, 2015 01:57
1 minute read.
A drip irrigation farm.

A drip irrigation farm.. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

Aiming to boost crop yields of plants such as chickpeas and soybeans, the Hebrew University’s Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment has been awarded a $789,000 grant from the US Agency for International Development.

The grant, whose application was facilitated by the New York-based American Friends of Hebrew University, will enable the establishment of a Unit of Correlative Microscopy at the university’s Rehovot campus. By employing the advanced microscopy equipment, researchers will be able to study the tissue and cell makeup of crops while they are grown under environmentally stressful conditions, the American Friends of Hebrew University said.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


The goal of the research unit, which will be funded by USAID’s American Schools and Hospitals Abroad program (ASHA), is to boost crop yields by improving plant-breeding techniques.

This USAID program funded a $400,000 grant to the Hebrew University campus in 2013, to upgrade its Phytotron climate- controlled greenhouse.

“AFHU [American Friends of Hebrew University] is delighted to continue this vital partnership between the Hebrew University and ASHA,” said Beth McCoy, national executive director of AFHU. “ASHA’S commitment to assist developing nations is enhanced by the Hebrew University’s efforts to help feed the world by developing tools and methods to grow hardy, healthful crops under challenging environmental conditions. The university has great expertise in plant sciences, knowledge that is urgent in light of rapid population growth worldwide.”

Related Content

July 18, 2018
Rivlin and Kahlon inspect Kalandiya crossing

By GREER FAY CASHMAN