Hizbullah's launch capability seriously curtailed

Only a few launchers left with sufficient range to reach Afula and Haifa.

By JPOST STAFF
July 31, 2006 15:12
1 minute read.
katyushas 298 .88 ap

katyushas 298 .88 ap. (photo credit: AP)

 
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The IDF assessed on Monday that Hizbullah's rocket launching capability was significantly compromised by the fighting that took place in the past three weeks. It was estimated that, while the organization still has hundreds of rockets with a sufficient range to reach Afula and Haifa, there were only a number of launchers remaining with launching capability. The Hizbullah still had several Zilzal rockets left that could reach central Israel, Army Radio reported.

WAR IN THE NORTH: DAY 20
In the course of the fighting, the IDF asserted that it had killed some 200 Hizbullah operatives. Though most of the names were not released, one of the more prominent targets hit was Jihad Atiya, who was said to be responsible for the killing and kidnapping of IDF soldiers Benny Avraham, Adi Avitan and Omar Sueid in 2000. Meanwhile, it was released for publication that an IAF UAV bombed a truck that was said to have been importing weapons from Syria, through the Masnaa border crossing, into Lebanon. The driver of the truck was wounded, as well as four additional Lebanese customs workers. Israel had declared a cessation in IAF action, but reserved the right to attack in the case of immediate threat. Lebanese police officials, however, said two missiles struck near a vehicle carrying relief supplies near the Lebanese customs post. LBC television interviewed an unidentified man who was part of the convoy that was hit, reiterating that it was carrying private relief supplies from Syria.

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