Puttin’ on the Ritz: A worthwhile stay at the Ritz-Carlton in Herzliya

The English word “ritzy” comes from the deluxe Ritz hotel chain, the first hotel of which was opened in Paris in 1898 by Cesar Ritz, a Swiss hotelier, and investor Alfred Beit, a Jewish businessman.

By
August 19, 2018 14:52
4 minute read.
The salad bar at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Herzliya

The salad bar at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Herzliya. (photo credit: MATHEW SHAW)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

A tough assignment, but someone has to do it. Your faithful columnist arrives on a weekday morning at the Ritz-Carlton in Herzliya.

The English word “ritzy” comes from the deluxe Ritz hotel chain, the first hotel of which was opened in Paris, in 1898, by Cesar Ritz, a Swiss hotelier, and investor Alfred Beit, a Jewish businessman. It took until four years ago for Israel to get its first Ritz hotel, the Ritz-Carlton in Herzliya, but the hotel faithfully carries on the chain’s reputation for combining luxury and customer service. Some sources say that Cesar Ritz originated the saying, “The customer is always right.” Personnel are instructed not only to explain how guests can get to the elevators but to accompany them. Each employee has a budget to pamper guests without asking permission. When a bellboy heard a guest bemoaning the tennis racket forgotten at home, he surprised the guest by buying him one.

Read More...

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content