The Yehuda family Torah scroll

The Torah scroll was written on the finest deerskin available in Bahdad and completed in 1912; It now resides at the Ohel Ari Synagogue in Ra'anana.

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January 22, 2015 15:39
2 minute read.
Torah scroll

The Yehuda family Torah scroll.. (photo credit: Courtesy)

 
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The Yehuda family, who came to Iraq from Israel via the Spanish Exile, had for generations been among the rabbis and community leaders in Baghdad.

At the start of the 20th century, Yosef Yehuda and his brother Salah set out on a business trip to Iran. Yosef returned to Iraq, and Salah stayed there, as a representative of the firm. In Iran, he contracted a serious illness to which he succumbed. Back at home, and during the period of mourning, Yosef decided to have a Torah scroll written in memory of his brother and had it commissioned from the best scribes in Baghdad. It was written on the finest deerskin available and completed in 1912. The cover for the scroll was made of decorated and painted wood, covered with intricately worked silver, crafted by the best silversmiths of the time.

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