Trial set for Egyptian-American charged with advocating cuts in US aid

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October 25, 2007 14:13

 
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Egypt's prosecutor general has set the dates for four lawsuits against prominent Egyptian-American rights activists Saad Eddin Ibrahim on charges of harming Egypt's economy by calling for cuts in US aid, a judicial official said Thursday. The private lawsuits have all been filed by politicians and lawyers with links to the government in what observers say is a new way for the government to intimidate its opponents. Several newspaper editors received jail sentences last month after private individuals sued them for insulting the government.

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